Category Archives: historical fiction

School Holidays = Reading :-)

Students and teachers aren’t the only ones taking a break this week…  School holidays are a great time for authors to catch up on reading (and writing). Here are some books that I’ve been enjoying this week.

Mark Greenwood and Andrew McLean’s The Happiness Box is historical fiction at its best. The story gives deep insight into our shared history with Japan and Singapore in a way that’s accessible for young readers and despite the wartime backdrop of Changi, the tale is uplifting. With it’s interesting endnotes The Happiness Box will be a valuable reference for teachers.

The cover of Frané Lessac’s Under the Southern Cross is beautiful and I smile every time I see that cheerful dolphin popping it’s snout out to smile at Banjo the dog. Children will love searching for Banjo on each page, exploring fun facts and looking for different constellations. This book is joyful and it also has wonderful endnotes.

Cristy Burne’s Off the Track is a super-fun holiday read. Hurrah for books that celebrate ’embracing the great outdoors’ without mobile phones! This is a story for anyone, but I especially loved the WA references to Bibbulman Track markers, snottygobble and so on …

And my current ‘age-appropriate adult read’ is Laline Paull’s The Bees which was recommended by my friend Venetia because she knows I love anthropomorphic stories. The Bees is told from the point of view of a bee, which was strange at first, but once I adjusted to this unusual perspective, I’m loving it. Who knew that drones could be so badly behaved and how rigidly in-hive hierarchies are maintained. This is one of the oddest books I’ve read but it’s strangely compelling. Has anyone else come across it? I’d love to hear your thoughts and I’ll post again once I’ve dipped further into the ‘want-to-read’ pile by the bedside.

Bookweek Month – that’s a wrap.

As Bookweek Month draws to a close, children’s authors and illustrators across Australia will be slowing down before heading back into their creative caves. I’ve had a wonderful Bookmonth travelling from Albany to Broome, from Perth to Sydney, from Canberra to the NSW Central Coast. Massive thanks to the dedicated teachers, librarians and Children’s Book Council of Australia volunteers who organised my visits. You are legends! I’ve met thousands of young readers and seeing that the joy of reading is alive and well enriches my work and inspires me.

 

 

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Students from Roebuck Primary

When you live in chilly Albany, being invited to celebrate Bookweek with Broome students, teachers and librarians in July is like winning a children’s author lottery.  During a week of presentations, I spoke with hundreds of students from Years 3 to 10. Broome library staff made a great welcome display and young readers from St Mary’s College, Broome Primary and Roebuck Primary came into the library to ‘Find Story Treasure’ and celebrate the Bookweek theme.

On Tuesday, librarian Alison Morris and I met James the pilot and flew north to meet students at Sacred Heart School Beagle Bay for two sessions and then on to Christ the King School at Djarindjin Lombardina where I was honoured to receive a copy of Djarindjin Gorna Jawal – stories from students. It’s a beautiful production.

My novel The Dog with Seven Names is set in the Pilbara and Kimberley. The story links to the Royal Flying Doctor Service and I loved seeing this beautiful landscape from above in a way that was similar to my own dog character’s experience.

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My last Broome event was part of Corrugated Lines Festival of Words. I worked with a fascinating group of writers of different ages and backgrounds. Our session focused on Creating Historical fiction. Some great stories were shared, which I hope will someday be published. As Remote Regions Coordinator for SCBWI West, it was also fun catching up with local author/illustrator Kerry Anne Jordinson. Her Bobby books capture Broome-time and I also loved Kerry’s Back Room Press picture book, Storm Pearl.

After Broome it was home to Albany for a few days before flying to Sydney to speak at the CBCA NSW Kids Bookweek Event. What an honour! The event was streamed to schools across NSW while hundreds of students and their teachers joined me in the auditorium to hear students reviewers speak about books on the shortlist. And then it was time to hear the announcement of the winning titles…  Being surrounded by excited book lovers made this moment very special. Thank you CBCA organisers and Fremantle Press for sponsoring my trip.

Next stop was the Central Coast where Lyndall Coles and a team of CBCA members had arranged visits to Gosford East Public School, The Entrance Public School, Brooke Avenue Public School, Wyong Public School, Tuggerah Public School and an evening event at Erina Library. In two days I met thousands of students and their teachers. This was my first time to the Central Coast and I loved visiting this beautiful part of NSW.

Tayla

Back to WA for my last Bookmonth sessions … The girls at Santa Maria College made me feel so welcome at their school (and their view across the Swan River must be one of the best in Perth). After my presentations, Tayla Tasovac interviewed me. She did a great job and the clip can be viewed on the Santa Maria Facebook page if you scroll back to August 24th.

Last stop for Bookweek Month was Great Southern Grammar. It was Daffodil Day and Head of Year 7, Karen Bradbury kindly gave me a bunch of flowers after my sessions. What a lovely way to end this busy and exciting month!

Well, that’s a wrap. Thank you to the teachers, librarians and book lovers for hosting me and for working tirelessly to foster a love of books in Australian students. The Bookweek theme was Find your Treasure and you guys are the true unung treasures.

 

Charlie D’Antoine and his great-granddaughter Taela

Meeting readers is my favourite part of Bookweek-Month and at Broome Library I had the honour of meeting Taela Tang-wei, the great-granddaughter of a little known World War Two hero. In 1942 Taela’s great-grandfather Charlie D’Antoine showed enormous bravery, risking his life to save a Dutch woman and her child after their flying boat was strafed in Roebuck Bay.Taela of Charlie D'AntoineOn March 3rd, Charlie was helping to refuel one of the many flying boats in the bay when enemy fighters attacked. He swam through burning fuel and wreckage to help the evacuees. Charlie was awarded a medal for bravery by the Dutch government. His actions are included in The Dog with Seven Names and you can find out more about his story here .

 

It’s BookMonth 2018!

Like many children’s authors and illustrators, I’m on the move for Bookweek/Month. First stop is beautiful Broome (I know, someone has to do it…).

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Karen Hasselo and Dianne at her father’s plane

Starting this weekend, I’ll be Writer-in-Residence for a week at Broome Library, speaking to schoolchildren in town as well as further out in Beagle Bay and at Djarindjin – Lombadina. I hope to hear stories as well as share the background to mine.

The Dog with Seven Names will have a special focus this week because of the book’s links to Broome’s WW2 history. As part of my research I travelled to Broome, Port Hedland and Marble Bar and Corunna Downs secret WW2 airstrip in 2015. You can click on the place names above to see photos and find out more.

On Saturday 11th, after my school visits, I’ll be presenting at Corrugated Lines: A Festival of Words. My workshop will focus on shaping family stories and local history into fiction.

Hope to see you somewhere in the Kimberley!

End of School Holidays Competition

Win a signed copy of Dianne Wolfer’s new book, The Dog with Seven Names.

Poor Harry doesn’t love dressing up, but maybe your dog does …

During WW2, the dog in Dianne’s new story is given seven names; Princess, Dog, Flynn (after the founder of the Flying Doctor Service), Gengi (gold), Florence (after the famous nurse), Pooch and Engel (angel).

Choose one of those names as inspiration to style your own dog and send Dianne a photo. The one Harry likes best will win a signed book (posted to you). Photos will be shared on Dianne’s Blog and/or Dianne Wolfer – Author Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/DianneWolferAuthor/

Please email photos and your dog’s name to dianne@westnet.com.au before July 31st.

‘In the Lamplight’ – UK book launch

Now that I’ve caught my breath after returning from my whirlwind UK book launch and schools tour, I can at last share some of the lovely photos.

The Harefield Library and Harefield History Society both gave generous support, making the UK launch of In the Lamplight a friendly and memorable occasion. Library staff decorated their function room with Australian and British flags symbolising the close connection their town shares with Australia. Lara Marshall, Richard May and their team also provided a beautiful afternoon tea, complete with savouries, delicate cakes and delicious scones, jam and cream. Their kindness made me feel so welcome.

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with Harefield library staff

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With Harefield History Society members. Andy Harris (front left) gave valuable research help.

After a presentation showing pages from the book, with images from Harefield and evocative charcoal illustrations by Brian Simmonds, we shared stories about WWI, the village, now and then, and also the hospital. Then we enjoyed the scrumptious food. I learnt a lot more about the town’s history and made lovely new friends.

Despite the perfect spring sunshine outside, it was a wonderful turnout, made even more special by the arrival of family members, Brooke and Justin, who are working in Peterborough. Linda Evans my very first contact in Harefield also popped in for a chat, despite having another commitment. Thank you to everyone who helped make the celebration so special. I’d encourage any Australian history lovers who are visiting London to add a side trip to Harefield to visit the WWI Anzac cemetery and meet the friendly locals. I’m hoping to return and fingers crossed for another visit in 2019.

 Thanks again, to the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries for funding support which made this launch possible.

School visits in the UK

 

I’ve enjoyed a wonderful week of speaking and workshopping at schools across Hillingdon and Greater Manchester, celebrating the launch of In the Lamplight which is set in the UK during WWI. Students were keen to tell me about their favourite books and share personal stories. Some lovely readers like Karl from Harefield and suffragette Alice from Altrincham (pictured above) also love writing stories. And Karl wants to become an author 🙂 I was made welcome at all of the schools; thank you to staff at Harefield Infants School, Harefield Junior School, Harefield Academy, Hermitage Primary, Cedar Park School, St Vincent’s Knutsford, St Vincent’s Altrincham and Loreto Preparatory School.

There were so many highlights. I especially enjoyed talking about Australian/UK WWI links especially those relating to Harefield Hospital. Showing historic photographs that appear in the book was fun and speaking to hundreds of St Vincent’s Altrincham students dressed in costumes for History Day was amazing. Thank you to parent helpers Sharon Dobson and Catherine Collins (and Lucy, Molly and Erin) for introducing me to your fabulous schools. It’s all been wonderful …

And a special bouquet to my friend Clare Valley (originally from the UK) for sharing school/friend/family contacts. For fellow Australian authors planning a book tour, one of the most valuable things I’ve learnt from this experience is the importance of connections and word of mouth. UK schools are very security aware, without introductions from Clare I would not have been able to reach as many readers. Clare put hours of her own time into helping me plan and I am very grateful.

And thank you again, to the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries for generous funding support.