Tag Archives: Fremantle Press

The Nance Donkin Award

I’m thrilled to announce that today I was awarded the Society of Women Writers Nance Donkin Literary Award. This national award is given biennially to a woman writing for children. Thank you Lisa Riley, Publisher for Young Readers at Penguin Random House for attending the ceremony on my behalf. I’m deeply honoured to receive an award in memory of this pioneering Australian author and as I’ve outlined in my acceptance speech below, the award links back to the first steps I took on my writing journey with the WA branch of  the Society of Women Writers. The image below shows me accepting the SWW Bronze Quill Award in 1992 with baby Sophie (now 27) in tow.

Jumping ahead to 2019 …

Here is my Acceptance Speech for the  2019 Nance Donkin Literary Award

Thank you for this great honour. I wish I could be with you at the awards ceremony today however I am in Albany, Western Australia, taking part in the University of WA (Albany campus, where I work as tutor) 20 year celebrations. Thank you, Lisa Riley, Publisher for Young Readers at Penguin Random House, for kindly representing me and accepting the Nance Donkin Award on my behalf.

As a regional author living five hours from what is said to be the most isolated capital city in the world, it’s wonderfully reaffirming and humbling to be chosen as winner for a national award that recognises and encourages women who write for children. Although I’m not with you in person today, I know that we are all together in spirit as women who write.

The Society of Women Writers will always hold a special place in my heart. As a nervous young aspiring author, living away from family and friends on the other side of the country, I joined the WA branch of the Society of Women Writers. A warm circle of kind, wise and supportive women welcomed me. I’d found my tribe. I was teaching at the time and could not attend weekday meetings, so I joined a magazine group. How I looked forward to seeing that bulky envelope sticking out of my letterbox each month. I’d make a cuppa then settle down to read my fellow members’ offerings, write gentle suggestions for them and pore over their feedback on my own scribblings. This group provided valuable encouragement and counsel as I learnt my craft. Years later when a few SWW members decided to begin a critique group focusing on writing for children and younger readers, I became editor.

The WA branch of the Society of Women Writers also sponsors the Bronze Quill Short Story Award. It was the first writing award I won, in 1992. My story, Gokiburi (meaning cockroach in Japanese), was loosely inspired by moving north to Carnarvon as a young Victorian-trained teacher after living in Japan for three years. The story is about a Japanese wife trying to adapt to life in a new place, something I’d experienced both in Tokyo and in the west.

I’m thrilled to now win another Society of Women Writers Award, one that honours an inspirational, dynamic Australian woman who was a pioneer of children’s literature. Sadly I never met Nance Donkin, however I know that, amongst many other things, she worked tirelessly to enable children’s authors to visit regional schools, a cause very dear to my heart. Each year I travel to remote communities across Australia, reading stories and facilitating workshops for hundreds of students. I love quirky outback stories and now serve as Remote Regions Advisor for the WA branch of my current tribe, the Society of Children’s Book Authors and Illustrators. Now, when I visit students across WA and beyond, I will think fondly of Nance and her important work in promoting regional school visits.

I would like to thank my peers, the family of Nance Donkin, the judges and all who facilitate this prestigious award which inspires and validates children’s literature. Thank you also to my agent, Clive Newman and publishers, Fremantle Press, Walker Books, Cengage Learning and Penguin Random House for publishing my nineteen books to date.  I hope there will be many more.

Writing can be a solitary and sometimes frustrating occupation. Moments like this make the months of writing, researching and editing worthwhile. I am deeply humbled to receive the Nance Donkin Award. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Wishing friends and readers a safe and peaceful festive season

Thank you teachers, librarians, booksellers, readers and the teams at Fremantle Press, Penguin Random House, Black Swan Theatre, the Literature Centre and CBCA for your support throughout 2018. It’s certainly been an eventful year, with the publication of two new books, In the Lamplight and The Dog with Seven Names, a UK launch and book tour, Candlewick’s US release of Nanna’s Button Tin, school visits across WA and NSW, and the regional WA tour of Black Swan Theatre’s wonderful adaptation The Lighthouse Girl.

Other 2018 highlights include ASA mentoring the super talented Amelia Mellor, speaking at the National ALEA/AATE Conference, Write Around the Murray and the CBCA NSW Kids Bookweek event. I love being part of the friendly and inclusive children’s literature community. Special thanks to the SCBWI West team for all that you do to support creative spirits.

2019 looks like being another exciting year. More about that in a few weeks. In the meantime I’ll be enjoying a quiet family Christmas at home, with plenty of beach-time, reading and the odd glass of bubbles. I’m also happily writing something new. Stay safe and thank you for helping to make 2018 a good year.

 

Bookweek Month – that’s a wrap.

As Bookweek Month draws to a close, children’s authors and illustrators across Australia will be slowing down before heading back into their creative caves. I’ve had a wonderful Bookmonth travelling from Albany to Broome, from Perth to Sydney, from Canberra to the NSW Central Coast. Massive thanks to the dedicated teachers, librarians and Children’s Book Council of Australia volunteers who organised my visits. You are legends! I’ve met thousands of young readers and seeing that the joy of reading is alive and well enriches my work and inspires me.

Broom

Students from Roebuck Primary

When you live in chilly Albany, being invited to celebrate Bookweek with Broome students, teachers and librarians in July is like winning a children’s author lottery.  During a week of presentations, I spoke with hundreds of students from Years 3 to 10. Broome library staff made a great welcome display and young readers from St Mary’s College, Broome Primary and Roebuck Primary came into the library to ‘Find Story Treasure’ and celebrate the Bookweek theme.

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Booktrailers

Book trailers are a wonderful way for readers to peek into a book and gain a quick understanding of what the story is about so they can then decide whether to buy/borrow and read.

James Foley and Fremantle Press created a cracker clip for my Light Horse Boy, and there are multiple clips linked to Lighthouse Girl (details below), however as yet, there are none for my other books. And so, my resolution for March, is to make at least one more book trailer…

There are two specific Lighthouse Girl clips on Youtube. I love the trailer that was created by Year 4 students at Rosalie Primary School in 2010 – great that it’s still out there…

Then there is my own first attempt at creating a trailer. It’s quite factual and a bit basic as far as clips go, but it gives a nice view of King George Sound and Breaksea Island.

There are many, many YouTube clips linked to the Little Girl Giant, a character which was inspired by the book, Lighthouse Girl (more details on earlier posts). Amongst the terrific clips below, is one posted by Tracey Timmins, the granddaughter of Fay (the lighthouse girl). It’s a crackly but close-up view of Fay as the Little Girl Giant at PIAF 2015. There’s also one that I posted, and others by people I don’t know.

The first waking up

Walking

Waking up to Edith Piaf      DSC_0245

A lovely soundtrack version clip linked to Lighthouse Girl is by Caddy Cooper  Her clip features a song that she wrote, The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter which was inspired by Fay.

I hope that more clips of my books will appear soon. In the meantime, you might like to check out these clips by other WA authors and illustrators:

My Dead Bunny , The Last Viking Returns, Ned Kelly and the Green Sash,  A is For Australia, Zac and Mia,

This is just a sample, you will find more on most authors’ websites…

 

How to create a picture book

Both published and Aspiring and published authors and illustrators will be fascinated by this ‘behind the scenes’ peek of the process by Cate Sutherland, Children’s Publisher at Fremantle Press.

Children’s publisher Cate Sutherland discusses the trials and the triumphs of publishing children’s picture books.

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July 23rd – Light Horse Boy classroom ideas

Fremantle Press has just launched a fun new teacher feature on their website, looking at how a teacher has used a particular book in the classroom.

The first book featured is Light Horse Boy, with links to interesting classroom activities done by Sarah McNamara and her students at Flinders Park Primary School in Albany. Click the link below to read more.

Teacher Feature on Light Horse Boy (external site)